Episode 7: Eric Maydew of Kansas Big Brothers Big Sisters

By Clint Patty, J.D.

Clint Patty:

Well, hello there. Welcome to Investing in Good, a podcast that shines a spotlight on those making a profound impact within Northeast Kansas. This podcast is proudly presented by Clayton Wealth Partners, your partner in philanthropic financial planning for individual donors and investment management for endowments, foundations, and nonprofit organizations. In each episode, we’re going to sit down with the remarkable leaders and dedicated workers of nonprofits across the state of Kansas.

We’re going to listen to their stories, learn about their causes, and talk about the challenges they have in making the lives of Kansans better each and every day. So stay tuned now as we delve into our next inspiring story on Investing in Good.

Welcome back to Investing in Good. I’m Clint Patty, the managing partner at Clayton Wealth Partners. Pleased again this week to have with me another great member of this community, the area director for Kansas, Big Brothers and Big Sisters, Eric Maydew. Eric, welcome to the podcast.

Eric Maydew:

Thanks for having me.

Clint Patty:

Eric, we always like to start every one of our podcasts with a little bit of get to know you. So knowing that you’re not originally from the Topeka area, just want to hear a little bit about your story and how you became the area director for Big Brothers Big Sisters.

Eric Maydew:

Let’s see here. I’m born and raised in Denver, so I’m not exactly a local, but I’ve been here almost 20 years. So I guess I’m local.

Clint Patty:

That counts as a local in my book.

Eric Maydew:

But I was an athlete in school. That was the first time that I’d ever become a big, when I was about 20 years old, beautiful Liberal, Kansas, if anybody’s ever been there. And they approached the athletic department about this need locally to help some kids. And aside from school and sports, I had time, even if it was just a couple of hours a week, a few hours a month. And so I signed up to do it. It was amazing. At 20 years old, you don’t really know what to expect, but I was matched for a year. I ended up obviously transferring schools, and so that became difficult to maintain that relationship.

We didn’t unfortunately, but I hope it was impactful for Adam. It certainly was for me. And so fast-forward a lot of years, and I moved to Topeka in 2009. Do a few things here and there, and then this position came open. Actually, my wife applied before it knowing that I had had a background with this organization, specifically Kansas Big Brothers Big Sisters. And I had been looking at the time and she told me about it, told me I should go for it, and I did. Obviously got a couple interviews, did okay. And so here we are almost eight years later, I’ve been doing this now.

Clint Patty:

Wow. So started out as a big in college and now you get a chance to run the entire program here. That’s pretty exciting.

Eric Maydew:

It’s definitely been a trip. It’s been a lot of work. We weren’t in the healthiest of places when I started here. We’re on really firm ground now, thanks to obviously a lot of amazing people. And so I’ve kind of had a chance to see it all. I learned a lot about myself in this process. It’s been frustrating, rewarding, all the things you learn about leadership. You learn a lot about yourself when you become a leader obviously, you got to do a lot of pointing inward instead of outward and have a look at yourself.

And so it’s done a lot for me. It’s just taught me a lot in my career. And so this is the longest I’ve ever been in a position, at least thus far in my life. And so it’s been really rewarding, but a lot of hard work too.

Clint Patty:

That’s wonderful. Well tell for the people in our audience who may not be aware of exactly what Big Brothers Big Sisters does. Talk about the programs that you have here in Shawnee County.

Eric Maydew:

We’re pretty lucky. A lot of people have at least heard of us in some capacity. We are one-to-one mentoring organization, and we are Kansas Big brothers Big Sisters. So naturally we’re here in Topeka in Shawnee County, but we’re all over the state as well. So we’re actually headquartered out of Wichita. We have hubs in Pittsburgh, Lawrence here, Manhattan and Hays. Those are our biggest communities and we serve rural communities around those in some cases. And so that’s kind of how we’re structured. And then if you don’t know what we do, a lot of the kids that we serve come from some pretty tough backgrounds.

A lot of single-parent homes. They maybe have witnessed or been a part of some type of abuse, drug and alcohol addictions. A number of things that can really have a negative impact on a child. And so what we do is we find volunteers in the community and we match them up with these kids and it creates a one-to-one mentorship and gives these kids a little bit of a leaning block. Somebody that they can listen to that isn’t necessarily directly related to them. Somebody that’s willing to listen and just spend some time. And oftentimes they’ll confide in those mentors. And a lot of times that’s what it is, they just need an outlet.

They need somewhere to be able to go with some of the stresses that they’re dealing with. Not that they need them fixed per se, but they just want to be heard and understood. And they’re kids, they know how to talk. Sometimes it takes a little bit, but it truly is an impactful organization, been around for over a century from a nation’s perspective. And so we’re pretty lucky. Like I said, a lot of people know what we do, but if you have a couple of hours a month to spend with a kid and have a lasting positive effect on their life.

Clint Patty:

So that was going to be my question. So let’s say that I’ve got a passion for mentoring kids to try to help maybe some of these folks that we think of as at-risk. What do I do? How do I come to you? What’s that commitment look like? As a mentor, what are your expectations for mentors in Shawnee County?

Eric Maydew:

Good question. Oftentimes people are a little bit on the fence because one, they don’t want to let somebody down. That’s probably the number one thing we hear the most. Second thing we probably hear the most is time. Our world just continues to get faster and faster, and it’s becoming tougher to slow it down on our own. So there’s a number of ways to get involved. I think it’s important to talk about the ways that you can get involved and then kind of our processes.

And so we have a number of programs that might fit for someone and not the other. So the one we’re probably most known for is the community-based program. And that’s where you can take your little to the movies, go to the park, go hiking, go fishing, play board games, play video games, whatever it might be.

Clint Patty:

That’s up to the mentor and the little, right? That’s not something you all decide.

Eric Maydew:

Nope. We do gain some of that information in the enrollment process, and that leads me down to we do what’s called a best-fit match. And so we take like personalities and interests and obviously try to pair them together in hopes of a long-term relationship. That’s the goal. And so that’s community-based, site-based, takes place in the schools, and so you don’t meet on breaks, over summer, things of that nature. You simply meet with your little once a week at their school, do homework, play a board game, have lunch together. It is a shortened amount of time, as most people know, these kids don’t get a ton of time for lunch and recess anymore.

And so it has its place. It works for a lot of folks, but we also see a lot of folks start there. And then they end up transitioning into the community-based because they then realize, “Wow, this is pretty awesome. I’d like to just have more variety of things to do.” And that’s where that community-based program comes in. But then there’s the types of matches. So obviously you can do it by yourself, but we also do couples matches and family matches. And that’s where… When I was talking about time and it’s just stretched so thin and everybody’s running lean.

That’s a great way to get involved and still show these kids what a healthy family dynamic looks like and just weave them into your every day. I always use the acronym KISS, “Keep it simple, stupid.” I try not to overthink things as best I can. I am a thinker. But same thing here. It’s important to say, is this right for me? But we help you with that process. We ask you all the questions, get you thinking about things that maybe you are not, but then we get you the intimate details of our program too. What’s required.

We do ask one year minimum commitment because we’re not trying to create another revolving door for our kid if we can avoid it, but that’s also two to four hours a month. If we’re talking the community-based program, which isn’t a ton of time. On average, I think nationally we spend seven hours a day on screens and we’re asking for two to four hours a month in person with a child. Just to give you a little perspective.

Clint Patty:

No, that’s a ton of perspective, and I didn’t know that statistic for sure. I just know from observing my teenage daughter that I think seven hours actually might be a little light. But it is true. And I call that downtime, if you factor up all the real downtime we have, most people have two to four hours a month they could give up.

Eric Maydew:

And conversely, a lot of these kids are on screens, and it’s a balance. I think all parents out there can relate to this. That technology is evitable, it’s around us, it’s everywhere you look, and it’s about managing that for kids, social media, what have you, video games. But being kids also I think involves being creative, being outdoors, being able to just be yourself without the stresses of life. Kids should not be taking on adult problems, and so that’s an opportunity for them to do that and maybe rekindle some things that they haven’t done in a while. And same for us adults, right?

Oftentimes kids turn us into kids ourselves and remind us that, “Hey, you got a life to live here. You have more to offer than just checking in, checking out.” And we can all get into that rut. And kids have a funny way of offering that perspective of, “I got more to offer here, and I kind of enjoy it. It’s fun.”

Clint Patty:

I’m kind of amazed by the story that as a college student, I think about all the things that I was worried about in college. And I’m frankly a little embarrassed that I didn’t think like you did. And that was to act as somebody’s big brother. Talk about that experience. A lot of people don’t know you were a college athlete, baseball later, played some professional ball as well.

So here you are, college athlete, obviously at the top of your game, prime of your life, and you decided to become a big brother. What were some of the things that a college athlete was going to do as a big brother?

Eric Maydew:

I think why it’s so relatable for me, and I might be speaking for some other athletes out there that have done this, want to do this, what have you. But I was really lucky and grew up with a pretty awesome support system. I had an older brother, he’s almost seven years older than me. And so that mentality right there, I mean, I was in tow with my brother everywhere I went, but seven years is a lot, right? My brother was having his first child and I was in high school, you know what I mean? And my brother, he was always just there for me.

But I think also in athletics, you have to grow up pretty fast at a high level or any collegiate level really, because there’s a lot that they demand of you. It requires a high level of discipline and maturity at an age that you’re maybe not the most mature. You’re kind of thrown into it. And hats off to my coaches. I had really great coaches when I first started playing. They challenged us in all ways, and this is one of those ways that they challenged not just myself but my teammates and the entire athletics department is you need to find a way to get involved.

I think they recognize that the benefits long-term in your life are going to far exceed that of baseball. And so it’s not just a life skill to care about those around you, but it’s necessary for a healthy community.

Clint Patty:

We don’t talk about it enough, but it’s a selfish act really. When you give of yourself to somebody else, that feeling you get inside, there’s really nothing like that. And we need that as part of our lives. And sometimes it just takes getting over the hump of doing that. You as a big brother, were able to take your little fishing as a college student, which I think is great. I don’t think kids do enough fishing nowadays. If you find someone with some interest, you need to encourage that.

Eric Maydew:

Well, that’s just it. It’s an opportunity for you to maybe teach a child something they didn’t know but in the same breath, they’re going to offer you some perspective too, especially if you’re an empty nester or you haven’t had little kids around for a while, or like I was. You’d never done it before. I didn’t have a little brother or sister. I went into it completely blind. But I guess one thing I always say to folks is if fear of letting a child down is your concern, just answer this question.

Is this child better with you in their life for a small period of time or not at all? And that’s how you need to approach it. Have fun with it. Don’t be scared of it. I always tell people when things are scary or it doesn’t feel like you should jump, that’s oftentimes when you should be jumping.

Clint Patty:

And the fact is the people, if you’re really scared about letting a child down, you’re probably the perfect person to be a big because you care. And that’s all that most people want in their lives, especially as kids. You just want somebody that cares, even if it’s just for a short amount of time, few times a month. Well talk about the numbers. How many people do you serve in Shawnee County as far as littles and how many bigs? What’s the ratio look like as far as what we face here in Shawnee County?

Eric Maydew:

So we’ve got a hundred and roughly 40 active matches in the program right now. So those are matches that are meeting on the regular doing things. But then as far as the waitlist goes, we’ve got roughly 150 kids, plus or minus a few here or there, waiting for a mentor as we speak.

Clint Patty:

Is that more or less than what you normally would see?

Eric Maydew:

It’s pretty average, I would say from what we usually see, it is evitable. We have to have it. In some regard, we just don’t want it to be obviously too big because then we’re making promises we can’t keep and whatnot, and that’s still very difficult. We never have enough mentors and always have more need. It’s been that way since I’ve been here.

Clint Patty:

So if we can get 150 people to listen to this and step up, you’d love that.

Eric Maydew:

Yes, my staff couldn’t handle that intake, but I would have no problem making phone calls across the state to all of our match support specialists, asking them to handle a couple intakes so we could match 150 kids.

Clint Patty:

All right guys, you heard the man.

Eric Maydew:

Make us do it. We would love to.

Clint Patty:

For folks that are interested, and we will go through this a couple of times, what’s the best way to reach you?

Eric Maydew:

I would say just visit our website because there’s folks that might hear this that aren’t necessarily in our county, or maybe they’re close, they’re right in between a couple of our programs. We get a lot of folks that work in Topeka and live in Lawrence, for example. And so visiting our website, you can specifically select the community in which you’d like to serve.

So if you just go to kansasbigs.org and we have a button, it’s pretty easy on there to navigate. But to just become a big, you click that and then it’ll kind of prompt your way through that. It’s pretty simple.

Clint Patty:

So kansasbigs.org, for folks that are out there that might be interested in being a mentor, the need is out there, 150 short in Shawnee County. So we hope that folks will do that. Talk about some of the success stories, and I understand sometimes you can’t just drop people’s names, but without giving names, just specifically give our folks an idea of some of the successes that you’ve seen from this program.

Eric Maydew:

God, there’s endless that I’ve heard of. I don’t always get to have an intimate conversation with all of them. A lot of them come via social media or having conversation, “Oh, I knew somebody that was a big or I had a little 20 years ago and I still talk to them,” that kind of thing. But a few that come to mind. We’ve got some matches actively in the program that are about to graduate that have been together for upwards of 10 years, which is a long time. And so these bigs always talk about one, it is almost like watching your own child grow up really.

But getting to see the evolution of one another through that relationship and how things have changed, maybe what you’ve overcome. Those are the stories that we hear a lot about. But there’s one here locally too. You and I have talked about this, but Dick Carter, I know he wouldn’t mind if I dropped his name. He’s heavily involved in the communities and the scouts and all that kind of stuff. So he’s all about helping kids. But he and Chris, his little, were matched. I think it’s 1993. We talked about this before.

Clint Patty:

By the way, for those who don’t know, this is Eric and I’s second attempt. We did this podcast a week ago and I messed up the editing. So many of these conversations we’ve had. But I mean that’s 30 years, right? That’s crazy.

Eric Maydew:

They had a major milestone last year and we got to highlight them at an event. We’ve done some mission video work with them highlighting their story, and I just remember the part of that video where Chris was deployed in Afghanistan and Dick would have to call him at two or three in the morning because of the time changes and whatnot. But they were still that committed to one another as adults. They were both in each other’s wedding, both were there for each other’s kids. I mean, it’s wild how many things they’ve been through together. And to this day, we got an event coming here in a week. They’re coming together.

Clint Patty:

You talk about that two-way street, how both…

Eric Maydew:

Both were there for each other’s kids. It’s wild how many things they’ve been through together and to this day, we got an event coming here in a week. They’re coming together.

Clint Patty:

You talk about that two-way street, how both sides have needs and both get benefits from it. There’s no better program than this for that is there?

Eric Maydew:

No, it’s pretty wild. We’ve been around for a century. When you think about a hundred years, it’s a long time. But just the human effect, that’s really what it is, the connection of humans. And I think that we would all agree that we’re so connected via technology. We almost take it for granted what just human interaction will do.

Clint Patty:

Real human interaction, not over screen.

Eric Maydew:

Real, not FaceTimes, not Zooms, none of that. Just having a simple conversation or playing catch with a ball or having somebody that you can just talk to. You got something that you just need to get off your chest. We internalize so much now and it’s not healthy. We all have done it, me included. And being able to have those outlets, especially for kids, I think kids have challenges now that even 10 years ago they didn’t have. Social media and having access to the web and internet and there’s all kinds of safety concerns that come with those things both mentally and physically.

And to have a caring adult mentor in your life to be able to talk about, “Somebody at school was saying this about me.” You just don’t get into those dark places where you start feeling bad things or saying bad things to yourself when you have someone you can express it to. It’s when you feel like you don’t have that is when we get in trouble and we do not want that for our kids.

Clint Patty:

We had a prior guest on the podcast, was Chris Stewart who does a mentoring program here at the Bridge. Wonderful guy. But he had talked about some studies that talk about the need for each kid to have five positive adults in their lives somewhere. And for a lot of kids that might be a mom and a dad, and that’s great. And that’s two you can check off the list right away. But for most at-risk kids, they don’t have that. And so just the opportunity to put one more person to fill one of those five spots that maybe 20% you’ve covered, and hopefully the others will fall into place after that.

The studies are… And I’ve again talked about this on the podcast before because I’ve done a lot of research and mentoring, but there’s no question about the science of it. Kids with good mentors do better in school. They tend to have happier lives overall. They do better financially when they get out of school. They tend to progress in their careers better. There really is nothing more important than having that good mentor in your life. And so God bless you guys for providing that and it’s unbelievable. The organization’s been around a hundred years, but that may speak to the need as much as anything else.

Eric Maydew:

It’s always there.

Clint Patty:

Talk about partnerships that you may have with other agencies or other providers in Shawnee County that you collaborate with.

Eric Maydew:

I mean there’s a number of partners that we partner with. We specialize in one-to-one mentorship, but there’s a number of other amazing organizations. You already mentioned Chris, and what those guys do over at the Bridge, also a mentoring organization. But even outside the mentoring organization, there’s mental health, there’s counseling, there’s medical care, there’s hygiene, there’s a number of different things out there that kids need aside from just the services we provide. And so when we’re going through the interview process or we’re talking with these families and littles, obviously we’re going to discover some of those needs and we can help with that.

And that’s where having good relationships with other, not just nonprofit partners, but community leaders in general about resources available to families, kids and what have you is extremely important. So obviously in the youth serving realm, we’ve got relationships with the likes of family service and guidance center. Boys and Girls Club, who we’re oftentimes confused with. We’re different. I have to mention that.

Clint Patty:

I know you do.

Eric Maydew:

I got to mention that.  Obviously does great work. Vallejo does great work.

Clint Patty:

They do.

Eric Maydew:

There’s a million of them, childcare where… There’s so many of them that I could sit here and think of that offer some type of service or tangible item that helps for the betterment of one’s life. And so we try to refer our families on to those if we’re not what it is they’re looking for or if they need us and something else, there’s something else maybe we can help with. So we’re always one, trying to promote those relationships but find new ones because there’s a tremendous amount of need out there. And I think I can speak for most non-profits right now. The need and the resources available don’t exactly align.

Clint Patty:

They don’t match up.

Eric Maydew:

And I’m going across the spectrum here. I think they’re all feeling that right now.

Clint Patty:

Absolutely. Pam Evans was actually my first guest on the podcast several months ago. And from a mental health perspective, the need is staggering.

Eric Maydew:

It’s crazy.

Clint Patty:

And the work that they do is great. So putting myself in the scenario, if I’m a big and I’m developing this mentoring relationship and through it, discover that there is maybe a substance abuse problem or maybe there’s a medical issue or someone’s being bullied at school, what is your system then set up for? How do I report that? What do I do as a big when some of these greater concerns begin to pop up?

Eric Maydew:

So each of our bigs or our matches are assigned to a match support specialist, and they are trained. I mean, it takes a good while to onboard this position in our organization. It takes them anywhere from six to 12 months to really grasp the entirety of the whole thing. And that’s simply because of those protocols that we have built into place and being able to effectively answer those. Takes one experiencing it in some cases, but just learning it is a lot. And so it’s kind of a case-by-case basis. Fortunately, we don’t see a whole lot of extreme situations out there, but we do have a protocol for that.

But ongoing training from both a national and a local level for not just us but our bigs because a lot of our bigs maybe they’re not expecting it. And most of us rarely do or anticipate those conversations. And so just oftentimes it’s just, “Hey, this could be a conversation and this is kind of the steps that you can take to where we can find the answers that we need in order to fix the problem here and find a solution.” And so I could say what that is, but it’s different for every scenario.

But child safety is number one in our organization, and that starts at the enrollment process when it comes to somebody wanting to become a big, obviously we go through background checks, fingerprinting, interviewing, home visits. I mean, we do a pretty strenuous amount of work in that regard, and I think everybody would agree that we should be doing that.

Clint Patty:

Absolutely. Again, that website for folks that are interested in becoming a mentor, Eric.

Eric Maydew:

It’s easy. Kansasbigs.org.

Clint Patty:

And speaking of kansasbigs.org, if you go to that website, you’re going to find some information about a major event coming here, May 3rd. That I know you’re going to want to talk about today.

Eric Maydew:

We’re almost there. So here in Topeka, this is kind of our signature event. It is an adult-friendly event similar to what you find at some galas and things like that, but it’s called Bourbon Affair. We’re going on our sixth year doing that. We’ll be over here at Town Site Ballroom for the second year in a row. We’re pretty pumped about it. We’re doing derby theme this year, so you’re going to have your big hat on, right?

Clint Patty:

Absolutely. And the bright clothing and the whole deal. That’s fun. And I will say, as a long-time pattern of the Bourbon Fair, it has really grown to become one of the biggest events in town.

Eric Maydew:

It has. So much so, last year was almost too much. So we made some adjust —

Clint Patty:

Says the person having to organize it and do all the work,

Eric Maydew:

It’s a good problem. Every year we make adjustments. We try to make it better for our attendees. It’s a great opportunity for us to provide something to the community that we don’t necessarily have. It’s an opportunity to learn about things that people enjoy, in this case, bourbon and the history of. It’s a great social environment, a lot of community leaders, a lot of decision-makers in the room. But again, more importantly, it’s creating an event that is a lot of fun. It’s socially very popular.

Clint Patty:

It’s really popular too. And I hate to use the… I’m not one that engages in the generational war, but you do see a lot of Gen Z and Millennials there, which is different than a lot of events that you’ll go to that are adult catered and to peak it. The crowd tends to skew a little older, not this event. This event is all over the place. You see people in their twenties and then all the way up as far as you want to go.

Eric Maydew:

It’s a good time. And like I said, we try to provide something that speaks to everybody. I understand bourbon is in the title. It is a major highlight of the event, but we have something for everybody, so don’t be scared of that word. But it’s an opportunity to get 2-300 people right there in front of us and talk about what we’re talking about. I mean, we are having fun. We’re socializing and all the things, but we are constantly reminding our attendees, why are we all here today?

What is the real reason? What are we trying to accomplish together? Obviously raise a bunch of money for our program, but also raise a bunch of awareness too.

Clint Patty:

So that’s going to be May 3rd at Townside Plaza. And again, for people that are interested in tickets, they can get those by going to the website.

Eric Maydew:

Kansasbigs.org, and you can look it up by community. It’s very easy to navigate, and all of our events are actually on there, so if that one doesn’t get you and our golf tournament September does, they’re all going to be on there for you.

Clint Patty:

There are several great events that you put on, but boy, Bourbon Affair is just taken on a complete life of its own.

Eric Maydew:

It’s been awesome to watch. I mean, six years in, I remember when we started at Dylan House just under a hundred people, and I think we made maybe $20,000 that year. It’s a good starting number, but this thing is… Hopefully if things go the way we think they will, it’s set to net $125,000 maybe this year, which is pretty incredible in six years.

Clint Patty:

People who are a longtime enjoyers of bourbon, it’s one of those things that just nationally has exploded as a popular spirit. And we’ve talked about this before, but my gosh, good bourbon, you used to be able to buy for 30 to $50 a bottle if you can find it all, sometimes it’s 10 times or more.

Eric Maydew:

See and that’s where I would push back a little bit and say that it is still available at that price point. It’s become all about the allocated stuff, which is what you’re referencing. And we actually don’t go that route for a couple of reasons. One, you can’t get it, but two, it’s a bit cliche and this industry has blown up in the last handful of years. There’s so many micro distilleries, if you will, across the country.

Clint Patty:

It’s not just Kentucky anymore.

Eric Maydew:

No, that are incredible. And we actually try to explore that a bit. We do go down some of those lanes where… Buffalo Trace is obviously an iconic brand. We’ve done a number of tastings, all those. But we try to bring people into the fold on things that maybe they didn’t know about, right? Or it’s going to be a combination of either an allocated bottle, an expensive bottle or something you can’t necessarily get close to home or at all.

We’re going to try to combine those elements right there and create a tasting for everybody where you’re going to learn something, maybe want something, or you’re going to try something that you never have, and hopefully we can achieve all three of them.

Clint Patty:

That’s fantastic. Kansasbigs.org, if anyone’s interested, Bourbon Affair, May 3rd. I can assure you I will be there. Our company has supported it for many years now. It is easily one of the premier events in town, so just terrific. Let’s talk just a little bit about volunteers, and you had mentioned being about 150 short, but for people who have a business or are individuals that might be passionate about either mentoring or supporting you financially, what’s the best way they can go about doing that?

Eric Maydew:

They can get in contact with myself or really anybody at the office, honestly. We’re pretty tight-knit group, and so if you want to sponsor an event or you’re curious about maybe some of the other things we do, obviously we do fundraisers like this that are more adult-friendly, but we do match activities, Big Fridays. We have a gamut of things we’re doing at all times. It’s never just one thing that we’re working on. We’d love to host an info session at your place of business. That’s where we come in and we educate y’all about what it is we do. There’s no obligation whatsoever, but the more people that know what we do, the better.

Maybe they know a kid that needs something or maybe they have a nephew that is looking for a volunteer opportunity, or maybe they’re looking for an event to sponsor, or maybe they want to take some clients out for a fun evening, but also supporting a cause. I mean, there’s endless ways to get involved with us, and it’s a ton of information that we can never cover in one podcast obviously. Visiting our website or giving us a call at the office, if you have an immediate, “Hey, you know what? How can we get involved?”

Clint Patty:

What’s that phone number?

Eric Maydew:

785-234-5524. And obviously my name’s Eric, but anybody in our office can get you pointed in the right direction depending on which question it is.

Clint Patty:

Awesome. Eric, thank you for being a guest. Again, Eric Maydew, the area director for Kansas Big Brothers and Big Sisters. May 3rd, a huge event, Bourbon Affair. Make sure you get your tickets now. Eric, thank you for being on the program.

Eric Maydew:

Thanks for having me, and thanks for supporting us. We appreciate it.

Clint Patty:

You bet. Thank you.

You’ve been listening to another episode of Investing in Good. Today’s episode was brought to you by Clayton Wealth Partners. If you’re an individual seeking to increase your impact through thoughtful charitable giving, or if you represent an endowment, a foundation, or a nonprofit that’s looking to safeguard and grow your financial assets, please consider partnering with Clayton Wealth Partners. You can visit us at claytonwealthpartners.com and discover how we can help guide and empower you in your mission to make a difference.

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that this year, 2024, marks 40 years that Clayton Wealth Partners has been in business we would love to extend a very special thank you to our clients nationwide, in particular, a thank you to all of Northeast Kansas. We often say that we are here for you for the last 40 years. We are very thankful that you all have been here for us. On behalf of Clayton Wealth Partners, I’m Clint Patty. I thank you for listening. We will see you soon.

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Clint Patty, J.D.

As Managing Partner, Clint serves on the management team providing leadership, supporting business development efforts and providing client consultation.