Episode 4: Michael Odupitan of Omni Circle

By Clint Patty, J.D.

Clint Patty:
Well, hello there. Welcome to Investing in Good, a podcast that shines a spotlight on those making a profound impact within Northeast Kansas. This podcast is proudly presented by Clayton Wealth Partners, your partner in philanthropic financial planning for individual donors and investment management for endowments, foundations, and nonprofit organizations. In each episode, we’re going to sit down with the remarkable leaders and dedicated workers of nonprofits across the state of Kansas. We’re going to listen to their stories, learn about their causes, and talk about the challenges they have in making the lives of Kansans better each and every day. So stay tuned now as we delve into our next inspiring story on Investing in Good.

Welcome back to Investing in Good. I’m Clint Patty, the managing partner at Clayton Wealth Partners. Very proud today to have as my guest, Michael Odupitan, the Chief Executive Officer of Omni Circle. Welcome, Michael.

Michael Odupitan:
Thank you. Thank you for having me.

Clint Patty:
We always like to start this by getting to know a little bit about our guests. So for those who don’t know you, tell me a little bit about you and your journey to Topeka.

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah, I’m originally from West Palm Beach, Florida. I came to Topeka in 2002 on a football scholarship to play at Washburn University. Initially, I wasn’t supposed to come to Topeka. I was on my way to Southern Illinois. Got there for a short period of time during the winter and it was freezing cold and as a Floridian I told Coach, send me back home.

Clint Patty:
I’m not doing that much snow.

Michael Odupitan:
Couldn’t do it. It wasn’t really the snow, it was the cutting wind that was going through my pants and I wasn’t properly dressed. But I went back home and I had a conversation with Coach Kill and I begged Coach Kill. I said, hey, is there anywhere else that you can send me? And he was like, hey, I got a coach that’s at Pitt State. He may be transferring to another school and that school happened to be Washburn. And so I got a call from Coach Schurig and Coach Brown and said, hey, would you be willing to come to Washburn? And I said, hey, it’s my last option. I need to get out of the situation that I’m in. So I came to Topeka in 2002 and the rest is history.

Clint Patty:
And you had never been to Topeka Kansas in your life, is that right?

Michael Odupitan:
Never been to Topeka, never even knew where Kansas was on the map at the time. So very new to the surroundings. I remember when I first touched down and they was driving me from the airport to the school and I was looking around where am I? It wasn’t any houses. There were no buildings being a city kid. So I was really shocked about where they were taking me.

Clint Patty:
Where’s the ocean? You had to be wondering, where’s the water in this place?

Michael Odupitan:
Exactly. Where’s the trees? Where’s the greenery? It was a very different scenery, but over the years I’ve learned to enjoy it.

Clint Patty:
Well, we’re glad you did and thankful for Washburn football that you were brought here. So tell us just a little bit about Omni Circle, what it does, what it is. I know there’s a number, it’s fairly new, and so there’s a number of people not familiar with Omni Circle, but tell us a little bit about what Omni Circle does.

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah, so I started Omni Circle in 2019 when I actually moved back here. And there’s a little backstory behind me coming back to Topeka, if you don’t mind me sharing that.

Clint Patty:
I wish you would.

Michael Odupitan:
So in 2015, I left Topeka because I was looking for more expansion in my own personal life. Six months after I moved to Kansas City and [inaudible 00:03:34] and I told myself that I would never come back to Topeka. I lost my mom to cancer. And when I lost my mom, it was the hardest day of my life. It put me in a really dark depression, trying to figure out things, being the youngest of four, but also being the youngest, but also almost the oldest of four because I was the first one to go to college and do some of the things that I’m doing now in my life.

But after that time, I had to spend some time really redefining who I was and what I was going to do in life. Coming to Topeka, the goal was to make it to the NFL. And then when that didn’t happen, it was like, okay, what do you do now? You go to work. And so when my mom passed away and I went to the funeral, one of the things that resonated with me was how often people were telling the story of how she was the life of the party and how people enjoyed being around her. But for me, she was so much more. And so I wanted to let the world know the more, right, the things that she did to give back to the community, how she served people. And I felt like with me being the last of her children, I had an opportunity to continue that legacy.

And so in 2019, I was in Tulsa, Oklahoma and I was at a church called All Souls and Reverend Carlton Pearson. He said something that day that resonated with me, and he said, “Sometimes God out places in places you don’t know why you’re there, but you’re there to do God’s work.” And when I was on my way back to Florida, I decided to come visit Topeka one more time. And when I came back to visit, all of my friends told me, this is where you needed to be with the things that I was developing. And ever since I’ve been back, that’s what we kind of got the idea for really bringing Omni to life.

So in 2019, the goal was all these years that I’ve worked in social service, I wanted to see people do better. I wanted to see the opportunities for minorities and individuals that may not understand what was available to them, I wanted them to see that potential. And I was on that journey as well as I was healing from the loss of my mother.
And so when I came back here, we created an organization with a group of my friends from college, came up with a name, Omni Circle. We wanted to be present in the community as much as we could, which is the ideal of being omnipresent and the circle was going to be our community. And so what we created was an organization that was designed to unite and strengthen communities by promoting equitable opportunities for underserved members of the community to grow personally and professionally. And then later as we evolved, it was also to create economic impact through entrepreneurship.

Clint Patty:
So as a way to, I mean, if I could summarize kind of a way to fill gaps for people that may not be aware of all that’s out there to try to bring them to places where they can thrive, they can be educated, they can put their ideas to work.

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah. So my background is in social service. And so when I think about community building and the gaps that I recognized, I thought about myself, what did I not know growing up? But I also understood as I went through the process of going to college and expanding my understanding. And so now we say that we connect, collaborate to create. We want to connect people, we want to collaborate them to resources to empower them to become who they want to become at their greatest self and then when they find that purpose, we want to give them the opportunity to create. And so now that pipeline, from what we typically say from survival to creation, it gives a person the opportunity to transition. Sometimes there is gaps, you focus on just the community portion, but then if you just focus on the community portion and when that’s done, then what’s next? And so we want to provide steps along the way and walk along with those people as they continue to grow.

Clint Patty:
So give me an example. I’m somebody, let’s say that comes into Omni Circle. Maybe I’ve got some ideas for starting a business or maybe I’m struggling economically with making it day to day-to-day. As I come in, what would be the first thing I would see? What would be done as I come in?

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah, so one of the things, it depends on where you’re at so that’s why we try to offer it in three stages. And so if a person was coming in and we’ve had some individuals that say, hey man, I just need a job. And we met a young lady who was at a career fair and she came in and she said, hey, how can you connect me? And we utilize our resources to connect her to a staffing agency that helped her get a job. Once she went through the process of getting a job, she came back and then she started the second phase of our organization, which she became a member. When she became a member now we’re working with her to better herself and find her purpose in life and find what gives her motivation and inspiration to do more and whatever that may look like.

And so a big part of our organization, the core of what we do is developing people. We say, we want to focus on YOU, and you stands for your own understanding. I feel like the broader perspective that you have of the world, the greater you can perform in it. And sometimes we live by the ideal of, and a big part of our philosophy in our organization is the allegory of the cave. I discovered that my first year here in college.

Clint Patty:
Talk about that allegory for people aren’t familiar with it.

Michael Odupitan:
So Plato’s allegory talks about people living in the cave and not experiencing the daylight. And so in this cave, all they have is a fire and a puppet master that is projecting these shadows on the wall. And so with these shadows, all they see is these illusions of what they perceive to be real. And then one day you allow an individual to get out of that cave and he sees the light for the first time. And when the light hit his eyes for the first time after being in the dark for so long, it is blinding. You go through that culture shock of understanding, and that’s what they typically say, the light is the truth. And so if you get to the light and you start to get a greater understanding and a better perception of the world, you can see it differently, then now you have a different perception, you have a different understanding, and that allows you to perceive things differently. And now you’re moving in the world in a different perspective.

And so I kind of see that as what they would call a truth teller. Once you see the light, it’s your responsibility to help someone else see the light. And so with this idea of what we’re doing with Omni is as we grow people through our organization and they start to gain that perception of what is possible for them versus living by the illusion, and I say the illusion, I’ll just use myself as an example, as a kid, they always told me that if I was going to be successful, I had to go play football or basketball. And if they told me if anything else they said I could be a doctor or a lawyer or anything else, those were just illusions to me because I never saw a doctor, I never saw a lawyer, I never saw an engineer. But what I did see every day on the TV is football players and basketball players. And so that was the closest thing that I knew that I needed to go after.
But now we want to expose individuals to different careers, opportunities to see the world in a different way so that way they can go out to some things and our youth can go out to things that now appear to be more real to them.

Clint Patty:
And I would think in the minority community in particular, it’s tough because it’s sometimes it’s tough to find those role models that you see. Forget TV for a second, just people we see in our community. If you don’t see a doctor or a lawyer or an accountant or somebody that owns a business in your community, it’s hard to envision yourself as a child becoming that, isn’t it?

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah, I think that that’s the hardest part about living in the illusion. How can you follow the pathway of somebody who have achieved something that people tell you that you should go maybe pursue, but you’ve never seen the path? And so then you have to be the trailblazer to a new path of something that people are telling you of a perceived end goal.

And so I think that that’s where it gets very difficult for a lot of community members. And there’s not enough examples of individuals and when they are and when there have been individuals who have achieved that level. We have this really difficult place that we see now in certain communities where if you make it out, if you make it out and you become that thing, then the goal is typically to move away. And so you want to move to a place that is more comfortable or perceived to be more comfortable that will provide your children with a better life, which then you’re taking everything that you learned away from the community. And so how can anybody else then follow you?

Clint Patty:
And so with Omni Circle, the goal would be to empower people with those skills and that knowledge so that they can achieve some of those things that they may think are beyond them or that they haven’t personally been a part of in whatever community they’re in.

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah, it is the cycle. So as we say that people grow and become, and hopefully in the time that we are creating this cycle that when individuals achieve that level of growth, that they just cycle back into the community. There’s nothing wrong with you wanting to provide better living for your family or provide a better education for your children, but then we also have a responsibility to come back. We have a responsibility to come back and provide that knowledge and that skill and an investment back into the communities that you grew up in.

And so I think for me, creating Omni Circle and filling that gap was to bring those individuals back. Not necessarily saying that they have to do all the work themselves because hard to come back as an individual, but when you have an organization that you can support, it makes it easier for you to come back and provide some of that information back to the community.

Clint Patty:
So tell me about what is your long-term vision and furtherance to that, what is the mission of Omni Circle? You’ve kind of gone over that, but what would be your long-term vision of the impact Omni Circle will make in this community?

Michael Odupitan:
Long-term vision, I think we want to create a space that gives individuals fulfillment and also gives them the opportunity to create equity and equality for this community.
I think I would like to see a community that is well-diverse. I come from a well-diverse community, but I would like to see Topeka more diverse. I feel like communities thrive the best when there are diverse communities. And so we need to get people to the place to where they can have a voice for themselves as well, depending on what community they come from. We talk about underserved communities, we got to get to a space where everybody can add value to this community. It’s not just one group of individuals thriving and pushing the community forward. It should be everybody, but we need more people at the table.

And so that’s part of what I would like to see is seeing people be able to have the opportunity to thrive, get the resources that they need to become who they want to become or who they’re designed to become, and then give them the opportunity to create wealth in their community and build wealth for themselves and their family and create that legacy, but also be leaders in this community so that way we have a well-diverse community.

Clint Patty:
But for underserved communities, they have to feel like there’s a chance, that there’s something out there that can help them get to that next step.

Michael Odupitan:
So there’s that hope, right? We talk about hope and resilience. There’s a hard space, and I don’t want to speak for everybody here in Topeka, but just for some of the things that I’ve experienced in my time here as a social worker and working in the field of social work and being a foster parent for eight years, that hope sometimes is not always as present as what some other people may have of what they can potentially achieve in their communities.

When you have a system of, and we can look at it across the board, a system of redlining, a system of urban renewal to communities of color, it does something to people, and that then creates that cave to some degree. And so without the exploration outside of those boundary lines, which those lines were created to keep people away from the potential resources. So when you cut those resources off, how do you ever know how to develop that hope that you’re going to be able to achieve what everybody else is achieving?

Clint Patty:
And even removing those barriers, which I think sometimes we don’t take enough time to appreciate where we are. We spend a lot of time talking about how bad things are. We have come a long ways, but for people who don’t know that, sometimes it’s like you talk about with the cave, you remove the cave entirely sometimes, but if people don’t know it’s gone and they haven’t opened their eyes, somebody’s got to show them.

Michael Odupitan:
Somebody got to show. I mean, how could you ever know? What do you know? What’s next for you if you’ve never really experienced it? And that’s what I’m saying about the experience, you have to then show people the way. And so hopefully this organization is trying to show the people the way of saying, this is the pipeline. If you’re trying to get to these next steps, we don’t want to throw you in the fire because that can be difficult and that could be tragic to your growth as well, but we want to temper you into that process so that way, it’s not a fast process, it’s a slow process. We typically say if individuals give us three years, they’ll start to see the world in a different perspective and that takes time. It is taken time for people to get to that place or communities to get to that place, but it’s also going to take time for it to improve.

Clint Patty:
You’ve talked a lot about people that will, for lack of a better word, they’ll rise from their circumstances and they’ll get that great job and then they’ll leave the community. But not everyone does that, and some people have become excellent mentors. I noticed, I’ve watched a number of your speaking engagements, and I’ve heard you talk about the importance of mentorship, but for those who haven’t heard you speak about it, talk about the importance of mentors in people’s lives and how Omni Circle helps with that process.

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah, I feel like as you are growing and finding yourself, there’s some great books. I’m an avid reader, but there’s some great books like The Purpose Driven Life. When you’re starting to find what your purpose is, sometimes it can be difficult because you really don’t know which way to go, but a mentor can provide you with that understanding of something that you haven’t experienced yet.

And so what we try to do is we try to bring in different individuals from the community to shed light on what those experiences could be before somebody actually gets to it. So when they are in it, it is not something that’s going to cause more trauma because of the lack of awareness of what it could do to you or what it can provide for you. So a mentor gives you that understanding. And again, that’s what the wisdom comes from that we talked about. The mentor carries that wisdom because they’ve already had the experience, they already have the knowledge, but now they can guide you through. They’ve been there before.

And so as we talk about a big part of our organization, the core, and I said before that the YOU is what we focus on, the your understanding. The more you understand you, and the more that you can have somebody in your life that can help you understand, you become more empowered about who you are and what you can potentially achieve. And so when you have people that can guide you along the way, it makes all the difference. I think that’s the place of creating more leaders in the community as we talk about providing that education from a mentor, but it also helps you build that self-esteem.

And I’m a firm believer that once you build self-esteem, you start to develop group esteem, which is then the group esteem, which is in the belief in your community. And so when we say taking people from survival to creation, it is going from the I mentality to the we mentality to the us mentality. And so if we’re going to be a great community, we have to get people in the us mentality.

Clint Patty:
So let’s talk about other strategic initiatives or partnerships within this community that you’ve managed to achieve to help further this goal of turning the I into us.

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah, so, we’ve taken a lot of time in the last couple years. I think it is interesting because we’ve been building into these partnerships. It’s taken time for people to understand what we are trying to achieve with our organization and also doing it in a respectful way that we honor those individuals from this community. Because again, like I said, I’m not from Topeka. I’m not trying to tell Topeka who they need to be or individuals from here. I’m just trying to provide a resource that hopefully can help someone see something in a better light. So with the opportunity to have the partnerships as we talk about connecting with people, collaborating with them, and then also giving them the opportunity to create, a lot of these partnerships have been super beneficial to the things that we’re doing and all of the assets of the three stages of our organization.

But right now, one of the big resource and partnerships that we’re building right now is with the organization down in Wichita called Create Campaign. They’re doing a great job with helping us bring business development to the community. When we’re talking about the work across the state and all the great things that people are doing, one of the things that we say, it’s more about collaboration than it is about competition. We shouldn’t live in a space of competition. I think that’s the I mentality. People talk about that being the crab in the bucket mentality. But when we get to the interdependency, the us of building community, then it becomes true collaboration. And so when we are working with people that can provide that education to our community, it just strengthens everybody. And so we’re hoping that we continue to build partnerships that will allow us to provide a resource for individuals to grow as they desire.

Clint Patty:
Well, let’s talk about some of the success stories that you’ve had. Just give us a couple of examples of folks that have really been able to turn their lives around with Omni Circle.

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah, I like to give two examples that we see as our shining stars within our organization and I probably won’t mention their names, but I had a young man that I met when he first came to our organization, he was working at a casino, Prairie Band, and he came to the organization because his friend introduced him to me. But then he came because he wanted to provide his son with an opportunity to connect with other kids that looked like him. His son was a biracial young man, and at his current school, he felt like he wasn’t able to fit in. And so his father wanted to give him the opportunity to say, hey, let’s work with some other kids from these communities because this is how I grew up, and let’s give you the same kind of experience.

At the time, we were looking for somebody to kind of lead our mentorship program. And so he was one of the mentors that came in. But also as a time of him joining the organization, we did what we do, we helped him understand who he was as a person and empowered him as well. And in that process, I think he was making $40,000 as a employee at the casino and still not carrying that confidence to go out and do something more. At the time, he was telling me about the position that opened up and he was like, man, there’s a supervisor position that’s open and it’s $5,000 more. So we was like, apply for it. You should definitely apply. So he applied and he ended up getting the position. So great win for him, right?

Clint Patty:
Sure.

Michael Odupitan:
A few months later, very shortly after, and we talk about manifesting and attracting things that you want by being a person of action and through the mentorship program and he was building his confidence through talking to the kids and developing the program and we were walking him along the way. And then shortly after he got a call from the department, I think it was KDH and E, gave him a call and said, hey, we think you will be a great candidate for this new director role. And so-

Clint Patty:
Bet that was a little bit of a jump for him too.

Michael Odupitan:
A little bit of a jump. And so he was a little afraid, and it’s one of those things that we talked about. He was like, man, am I even qualified to take this position? And we’ve seen that. Multiple times within our organization when the pay raise goes up, some of our members are maybe a little iffy about whether they’re qualified to take that position. That’s the confidence. And so he applied and he ended up getting the position. But now I think being in that position, he has now opened his eyes to what the possibilities was for him, and then he’s now starting to realize that he was thinking small. And so he was one of our great success stories that we were really proud of the things that he’s doing now.

Another story, we had a young lady, and when I talk about the story, people may know who I’m talking about, but she was working at local TV station and broadcasting company and came to our organization because not from Topeka, but wanted to get active in the community. And she did. She got involved, we created a program, she ran the program, grew the program to over a thousand followers on Facebook, had a great following, but over the time of us also working with her, I discovered that she was only making $13 an hour. And so I’m like, wait, you’re doing all of this work and you’re only making what? And so utilizing some of our resources, we were able to connect her with some different people. And so with those connections and resources and the value of who she is, very smart individual, she was able to go on and work at another company that’s a pretty prominent company in this organization where she’s now making 65 plus.

And so those things is what we talk about. Part of our organization is we want to see people increase their salary, increase their wealth in their families because I think that once you get to a good place financially, it puts you in a different place where you’re not in that survival mode as much and you can start focusing on your purpose a little bit more. And so those two stories, I think where we’ve seen where this pipeline has been beneficial for individuals as they come through our organization.

Clint Patty:
And then the hope would be, I assume that they come back and they’re able to mentor and help other people along the way that come to Omni Circle for the same purposes.

Michael Odupitan:
Absolutely. They can now tell their story.

Clint Patty:
And they become part of that community.

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah.

Clint Patty:
All right. Tell me about the future, future growth, future expansion. Where would you like to see Omni Circle go as far as growth and expansion in the future?

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah, I think we are right now, we’ve been moving through our five phases of our organization. And that five phase basically is we say community, education, economics, environment and then now moving into our fifth year of our organization, we’re focusing on our culture. And so this is the part of our organization where we feel like we are going to be really good at, but we haven’t fully gotten to that place yet because still growing. And so creating a culture of constant learning, creating a culture of creativity, that’s going to take time. And so what we kind of see ourselves as we move up the ladder of building those five phases, I’m a big fan of Kobe, but I also believe that Jordan is the greatest player of all times.

Clint Patty:
Hear, hear.

Michael Odupitan:
And the Kobe system. And we use that ideal where he talks about success at success. And so when you reach a level of success, how do you then achieve more success? And it’s a process of adapting the process of changing your perception that we talked about getting out of a new cave, a process of being explosive, kind of the thing that we tell people live by 10 x, Grant Cardone. And then dominating the sector and then also as Kobe say, “Be the same animal but a different beast.”
So as we are building our organization, I think the thing that we want to become really good at is in the next steps of this is becoming the culture that we want to become and create that pipeline that people are growing through our organization, but they also are giving back at the same time. And when we get that down and we get that figured out, then I think then we’ll be ready hopefully to expand this into a different market.

Clint Patty:
Success begats more success. You can’t get away from it. This will probably be the only podcast ever where Kobe Bryant and Henry Kissinger are both quoted in the same podcast. I’m going to take a shot at it. In my office is a quote from Dr. Kissinger where he says that people think success is something that you achieve and then you bank it and you can draw down on it like you would a line of credit later on but it’s not that at. All success really is an invitation to the next more infinitely difficult crisis that’s coming. And so it never stops, like the circle keeps going, success is the same way, the expectations get higher and you’re just going to have to keep getting better and stepping up because it just never seems to get easier.

Michael Odupitan:
No, I think it gets harder. I think that’s the levels to the growth. I think as you climb one ladder and you get to the peak of that ladder, you thought like, this is the place that I thought that I wanted to be but as you continue to say, okay, well now this starts over all over again. It’s a quote that I heard that said, “The more that I know, the more I realize I don’t know.”

Clint Patty:
Yep, that’s a fact.

Michael Odupitan:
So once you achieve that thing and you think that, then you realize, man, there’s so much more world out here and there’s another level of success to go and achieve. So then how do you get to that point of continuing to adapt to that environment, continuing to expand your perception so that way you can become the person that you need to become to achieve that next level of success.

Clint Patty:
So what can we do as a community? I mean, what’s our job in helping to support Omni Circle either with dollars as volunteers? What is it you’re looking for from Topekans to help grow this great organization?

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah, I mean, we’re so young and we haven’t probably done the best job of this, but we’re hoping that as we grow and we can get some more support, I think funding as a nonprofit is always going to be helpful to an organization for all the things that we’re trying to do. I think we have a really high ceiling for the things that we can potentially achieve in this community. But again, for a long time it’s been myself and then a ton of volunteers.

I think as we look at expanding the work and doing it at a high level, it’d be great when we get to the point to where we can hire more staff and expand the work that we’re doing. So funding is always going to be one of our top goals, but also spreading the awareness about who we are. I think that that’s going to be another space. We hear people say all the time that I see this organization, I hear about it, but I really don’t know what they do. And maybe that’s because we been building every year still getting to the place of where we want to be so we haven’t settled yet, but I feel like we’re at a place now where we’re no longer creating new things, we’re just getting better at what we have. And so hopefully that gives people a better understanding of how it all works together.

But then also, I mean, we’re always looking for partners in the space that’s going to come in and provide educational opportunities. We’re looking for volunteers that’s willing to come and give back to the community. And also as the goal as we’re moving people through this pipeline is getting people access to capital. And so I think as we’re going to be able to change communities, we got to put some dollars in the communities that need it the most and then help them create sustainable businesses the way they can feed back into their own communities. And that’s how we’re going to see some of these communities grow, which will then add value to the overall community at large.

Clint Patty:
The us.

Michael Odupitan:
The us. Absolutely.

Clint Patty:
So for those who want to reach out and help, I mean, you’ve gone from, I know just a few years ago just being an idea to, you’ve got a building now that you operate out of, which is great. Tell us about where you are and for folks who might want to volunteer or give to Omni Circle, this is your chance, Topeka. Tell us how we get ahold of you and make that happen.

Michael Odupitan:
Yeah, so you can reach us at our email, probably be the best way to reach us is at info@omnicirclegroup.org. That’s omnicirclegroup.org. There, or you can call our organization at (785) 422-7459. But also you can come visit us at Omni Circle Collaborative Workspaces at 1301 Southwest Topeka Boulevard. We’re right on the corner of Topeka Boulevard and 13 Street. You can’t miss us. But yeah, we’re looking for individuals to come be a part and volunteer. We have an event page on our website that individuals can come and visit to see what we’re doing with all the different events and volunteer activities so if anybody wants to get involved, please reach out. We’re definitely looking for partners in the space, programming partners, funding partners, and just collaborative partners that’s going to help us continue this pipeline and strengthen it so that way we create a better Topeka.

Clint Patty:
And give us that website address.

Michael Odupitan:
So, the website address is omnicircle.co, and that’s just omnicircle.C-O. It’s not .com.

Clint Patty:
Easy enough to reach. You’ve been listening to Michael Odupitan, the Chief Executive Officer of Omni Circle. Michael, thank you for being here. I love your story. I love your personal story and the work you’re doing, and I can tell you from someone, a fellow person who lost their mom way too soon in their life, your mom’s looking down on you very proud right now.

Michael Odupitan:
I appreciate that.

Clint Patty:
For sure.

Michael Odupitan:
And thank you for having me.

Clint Patty:
Absolutely. Thank you.

You’ve been listening to another episode of Investing in Good. Today’s episode was brought to you by Clayton Wealth Partners. If you’re an individual seeking to increase your impact through thoughtful charitable giving, or if you represent an endowment, a foundation, or a nonprofit that’s looking to safeguard and grow your financial assets, please consider partnering with Clayton Wealth Partners. You can visit us at claytonwealthpartners.com and discover how we can help guide and empower you in your mission to make a difference.

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that this year 2024 marks 40 years that Clayton Wealth Partners has been in business. We would love to extend a very special thank you to our clients nationwide in particular, a thank you to all of Northeast Kansas. We often say that we are here for you. For the last 40 years, we are very thankful that you all have been here for us. On behalf of Clayton Wealth Partners, I’m Clint Patty. I thank you for listening. We will see you soon.

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Clint Patty, J.D.

As Managing Partner, Clint serves on the management team providing leadership, supporting business development efforts and providing client consultation.